How to Cook Smoked Pork Shoulder Picnic Ham

Last Updated on May 1, 2022 by Nazmin Sarker

Smoked Pork

A wide and varied choice of smoked pork shoulder picnic ham products is available, ranging from large holiday hams to economical, everyday cuts – smoked hocks, spareribs, and bacon. Half and whole hams should be stored in the refrigerator for no more than a week before use; ham steaks for 3 to 4 days; sliced boiled ham and prosciutto for up to three days; and bacon for 7 days.

Smoked Hams and Picnics

Both hams and picnics are usually sold fully cooked and ready-to-serve. Flavour and texture are improved by heating them to an internal temperature of 140° F. Or as the level directs. Some cooked-before-eating hams are sold; cook hams to an internal temperature of 160° F., Picnics to 170° F.

Fully cooked hams include the following:

Bone-in ham or its two halves- butt half and shank half. If sold as portions, several center slices probably would have been removed.

Partially boned hams are either shank-less or semi-boneless. In the latter case, both Shank bone and aitchbone will have been removed leaving only the leg.

Boneless hams, known as “rolled”, “shaped” or “formed” hams, are salt whole, weighing 7 to 14 pounds, in halves, quarters peace, and slices or steaks.

Canned hams are always boneless and fully cooked, and maybe smoked or unsmoked. Some are also flavored. Boiled ham is sold sliced by the pound or prepackaged.

Prosciutto is an Italian-style pressed ham, deep red in color, with a strong flavor. It is sold in pepper thin slices.

Cook before eating hams are usually sold bone-in. They include the country hams-“Smithfield”, “Tennessee”, “Kentucky” and “Virginia”. Country hams are usually heavily cured and smoked and require soaking and precooking unless level direct otherwise.

Smoked picnics are sold whole and usually fully cooked. When sold boneless they are called pork shoulder rolls.

Cooking Hams And Picnics

Roasting: Roast a fully cooked ham or picnic according to the timetable. A cook before eating ham should be cooked to an internal temperature of 160° F., a picnic to 170° F.

Plan to have the meat ready about 15 minutes before it is to be served so it can “set” for easier carving.

To decorate a ham score surface lightly in a diamond pattern and stud each diamond with a clove before it goes into the oven.

If meat is to be glazed, plan to start glazing it about 30 minutes before the end of cooking.

Cooking in liquid: place picnic in a large saucepot and cover with water. Over high heat, heat to boiling. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer until meat is tender 3 ½ to 4 hours. Drain.

Glazing after simmering: place picnic on rack in roasting Pan and bake in preheated 400° F. Oven for 15 to 30 minutes brushing 2 or 3 times with glaze.

Timetable for Roasting Smoked Pork

Type of cutWeight
(in pounds)
Meat thermometer
reading
Approximate cooking
time**

(in hours)
Oven temperature

Fully Cooked

Smoked ham whole half
or portion
10 to 14
5 to 7
140° F.
140° F.
2 ½ to 3 ½
1 ½ to 2
325° F.
325° F.
Boneless smoked
ham whole

half portion
7 to 10
10 to 12
12 to 14
5 to 7
3 to 4
140° F.
140° F.
140° F.
140° F.
140° F.
2 ½ to 3
3 to 3 ½
3 ½ to 4
2 to 2 ¼
1 ½ to 1 ¾
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
Semi-boneless
smoked ham
whole half
10 to 12
4 to 6
140° F.
140° F.
3 to 3 ½
1 ¾ to 2 ½
325° F.
325° F.
Canned ham1 ½ to 3
3 to 7
7 to 10
10 to 13
140° F.
140° F.
140° F.
140° F.
1 to 3 ½
1 ½ to 2
2 to 2 ½
2 ½ to 3
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
Smoked shoulder
arm picnic
5 to 8140° F.2 to 3 ¼325° F.
Smoked shoulder
roll (butt)
2 to 4170° F.1 ¼ to 2 ¼325° F.
Canadian-style
bacon
2 to 4160° F.1 ¼ to 2 ¼325° F.

Cook Before Eating

Smoked ham
whole
half or portion
10 to 14
5 to 7
3 to 4
160° F.
160° F.
160° F.
3 to 4 ¼
1 ¾ to 2 ½
1 ¾ to 2 ¼
325° F.
325° F.
325° F.
Smoked shoulder
arm picnic
5 to 8170° F.2 ½ to 4325° F.
  • You can see the youtube video for this time
Credit: Chef Billy Parisi

Smoked Shoulder Rolls

Roasting: Before roasting remove any casing then follow directions for hams; the internal temperature should be 170° F. A 2-to 4 – pound shoulder roll will take 1 ¼ to 2 ¼ hours. If desired, glaze as for hams.

Cooking in liquid: Cook and glaze as for picnics. A 2 to-4- pound shoulder roll takes 1 ½ to 2 hours to Simmer. Then, place roll in baking dish; glaze.

Ham Slices

Center-cut slices usually are cut from fully cooked ham. Ham slices 1 to 2 inches thick may be baked, broiled, or braised recipe. Slices 1 inch thick may also be pan-broiled. Broil or Pan- broil slices ½ to ¾ inch thick.

Broiling: Slash fat around edge1 ham slice in several places to prevent curling. Place a slice on rack in broiling pan and broil 2 to 3 inches from heat until browned on both sides, turning once. Ham slice 1 inch thick will take 16 to 20 minutes; slices of ½ inch thick are done in 10 to 12 minutes.

Pan-broiling: Rub the surface of the skillet with a piece of fat trimmed from the edge of the ham slice. Slash fat around the edge1 ham slice in several places to prevent curling. In a skillet over medium heat, cook ham slices until well browned on both sides, turning occasionally and pouring off fat as it accumulates in the pan.

Braising: Over medium heat, rub the bottom of a heavy skillet or Dutch oven with a piece of trim from the edge of the ham slice. Add ham and cook until well browned on both sides. Add a little liquid; reduce heat to low; cover tightly and cook until ham is tender.

Read more: Ham and Lentil Soup Jamie Oliver

Bacon

Bacon is sold in slices, varying in thickness according to whether it is thin-sliced, regular-sliced, or thick-sliced, or in pieces with the rind left on (slab bacon), for slicing as needed. The flavor depends on the curing and smoking process used, and the bacon may be lean or fat, depending on the cut from which it comes. Sliced bacon may be baked, broiled, pan-broiled, or Pan-fried.

Baking: Arrange bacon slices on a rack in open roasting Pan, overlapping the Lean edge of each slice with the fat edge of the next. Bake in a preheated 400° F. Oven until browned and crispy 10 to 12 minutes.

Broiling: Separate bacon slices choicely so they do not tear and place on rack in broiling pan. Broil 3 inches from heat for 3 to 4 minutes until browned; turn and brown another side, taking care not to burn the bacon. Drain on paper towels.

Pan-frying: In a cold, heavy skillet lay the number of slices required in one piece without separating them. ( A 10-inch skillet will hold one 8-ounce package of bacon slices at one time.) Over medium heat, cook bacon for 5 to 8 minutes, separating slices with tongs so they lie flat in the pan and turning them occasionally to brown them evenly on both sides. When browned, remove from Pan and drain on paper towels.

Canadian Style Bacon

Canadian style bacon is the large rib-eye muscle of the pork loin, cured and smoked. It is boneless and usually lean, and is sold in 2 to 4-pound pieces or sliced. Roast large pieces. Broil, pan-broil, or Pan-fry slices until lightly browned on both sides, turning occasionally.

Smoked Pork Lion and Chops

Smoked pork lion should be roasted. Chops up to ½ inch thick may be pan-broiled or Pan-fried; if cut thicker, they should be boiled or baked.

Carving Ham

Whole ham: Place on cutting board or warm platter, fat side up, with Shank to your right. Using a fork to anchor meat, cut a few slices from the thin side; steady ham for this surface.

Starting at the shank end, slicing down to the bone, cut out a small wedge of meat. Continue cutting down to the bone in slices ¼ inch thick until your reach aitchbone at the other ends.

Starting at the shank end, release meets slices by cutting along the leg bone. For more servings, turn ham to its original position and cut slices to bone.

Rump Half Ham: Place Ham on its cut surface. Using a fork to anchor meat, cut down along the aitchbone to remove a chunky boneless piece of meat.

Place the piece on its freshly cut surface and cut uniform Slices about ¼ inch thick down to the board.

Hold the remaining piece, slice across, then cut along the bone to free each slice.

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